Return Styles: Pseud0ch, Terminal, Valhalla, Blue Moon.

Pages: 1-4041-8081-

OSX 10 Yosemite

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 17:27

Why Apple's latest OS GUI looks so amateurish, ugly and flat, while software is so bloated and filled with spyware, like it is some Windows 10?

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 17:30

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 17:32

Windows NT 4.0 had best UI ever - simple, expressive and stylish.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 18:08

>>2
People are dumb, got it.
>>3
Grow up.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 18:37

OSX 10 Yosemite
Shalom!

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 18:37

>>4
I'm 32

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 18:50

>>6
cool

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 19:16

Windows users desiring to get the classic theme are tricked to download viruses, like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2fL1RRsuTw&t=312s

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 19:39

>>8
lmao how come viruses are still a thing
just delete the file boy
right click move to rubbish bin my friend
birus gone

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 19:53

>>9

It is actually possible to enable the classic Windows NT look (which is still bundled inside Windows 10), but most new programs would just crash:
http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/173367-simple-hack-enables-classic-theme-in-windows-10-and-8-too/

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 21:20

>>3
Windows 2000 was really the last decent version of Windows.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 21:21

>>10

It is still very usable if you replaces explorer with explorer++ and taskmanager with Sysinternal's process explorer. Taskbar is harder to replace.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 21:31

>>1
* macOS

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 21:35

High Sierra is the latest version, Yosemite came out three years ago.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 23:47

>>14
And it still looks like flat shit.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-27 23:57

Flat design was invented by these pretentious talentless design niggers, who can't design to save their life, but still want to earn some money, creating crap ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artist%27s_Shit ). It is easy to draw an ugly looking confusing black-and-white icon, instead of proper one.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-28 1:27

* Design African Americans

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-28 1:59

more like OSX 10 Yo(((semite))) amirite???

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-28 13:23

Where is Steve Jobs, when we need him?

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-28 13:28

>>18
Oy vey!

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-28 23:40

Looks fine to me.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 2:14

It's the best!

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 14:03

If osx sucks, then why does nikiketa refuse to make his game unless he gets a macbook?
Checkmate

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 14:54

>>23
Nobody ever said that Nikita was consistent.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 16:34

>>23

OSX sucks less than Windows or Linux.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 16:38

>>25

Although I'm sure, with no shareholder visionary at the wheel to enforce quality, Apple will kill their system, just like it happened after Job's previous departure.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 18:30

KDE5 and Gnome 3.2 are flat too.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 19:06

>>25-26
* macOS and Clang are the only good things Apple produces anymore.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 19:08

>>28
what about webkit?

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 19:42

>>29
Google's fork (Blink) has kinda taken over WebKit somewhat, but yeah, I guess you could include that as well.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-29 20:27

>>29
webkit
It's a KHTML fork.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-30 0:05

Fork my anus

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-30 0:06

>>31
Yeah, but Apple pretty much took it entirely over.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-30 7:44

>>27
you don't need Gnome or KDE. I don't have either of them installed

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-30 11:38

>>34

Ubuntu boots into Gnome 3. Checkmate, atheist!

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-30 12:08

>>35
Mine doesn't, uncheckmate.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-30 12:10

>>35
Linux is not just Ubuntu

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-30 17:12

>>35
UBANTO is crap and so is GNOME 3. To be honest, much of the main Linux userland is because of bloated GNU and systemd. Use *BSD to reclaim your sanity.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 4:48

>>38
Enjoy your no GUI.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 7:31

>>39
Thanks, I will! It's good for productivity and memory usage.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 8:03

>>39
X and window managers don't need Linux - and having those is enough to have GUI. nobody needs GNOME or KDE

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 12:40

>>41
you need it for them programs

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 13:54

>>38

BSD has no drivers. Especially no power management drivers. Enjoy your short battery life.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 13:58

>>43
You can change the CPU default freq/voltage in BIOS even if the os doesn't have a powersave mode(i assume its some laptop/mobile tablet thing), its called underclocking and undervolting.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 14:41

>>42
Not really.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 15:31

Nobody really needs a full desktop environment. X + wmii or i3 is enough.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 16:47

>>46
Most Linux software depends on desktop environment. Longtime ago there was KHexEdit, a a nice hex editor that did the job done. But since multiple incompatible API and ABI changes, there is no KHexEdit anymore, all work put into it is lost. And Linux software that is still maintained is cost a lot of man-years to keep working, instead of improving it, like i.e. adding in hex editor support for defining file structure, reading memory of any process, or integrating it with disassembler, so you can easily analyze your compiler's output.

Then again, you can't easily add support into your Linux program for reading the memory of other process, because ABI for that is very unstable.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 16:51

>>47
Good thing I left Linux then. And there are utilities like KHexEdit that don't require a full DE.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 17:07

>>47
shut up nikita and make your game

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 17:27

>>47
Hex editor is a typical crud app, it can't be that complex to depend on "unstable" APIs. heck a hex editor is much simpler than any text editor to write.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 17:37

>>50

Actually, good hex editor does a lot of stuff, including opening very large files and text input in various encodings.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 17:39

>>51
including opening very large files
Maybe if you're using windows, but that's not a problem with vim or emacs.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 17:57

>>52

I doubt Emacs can edit a 500 gigabyte HDD image, because Emacs is designed to edit small text files, that could be loaded into memory.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 18:18

>>53
because Emacs is designed to edit small text files
Incorrect.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 18:21

>>53
MUH
8
MEGABYTES

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 18:26

Been a while since we had a good Vim vs. Emacs fight.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 18:32

>>56
For a good reason. Both are toy editors used by ingrained manchildren who don't want to let go of 15 years of learning.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 18:42

>>57
I prefer Traditional Vi to Vim, but I wouldn't call Vim a toy editor. Emacs is bloated but so is pretty much anything GNU related.
ingrained manchildren who don't want to let go of 15 years of learning.
That kind of SJW frame of thought is why you have the abortion that is systemd and why the modern Linux userland and software ecosystem is so dysfunctional and fractured. The idea of ``If it's broken, don't fix it'' isn't just some mindless cliché.

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 19:00

>>58
If it's broken, don't fix it
Are you being ironic or is this a typo?

Name: Anonymous 2017-10-31 19:08

>>59
The latter. My bad, fucking phone.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 0:31

>>58
The reason why the distributions decided on Systemd is because they didn't want to work with what they had before. It was working but it was way too much effort to work with it. Systemd fixed that by making the init configuration a declarative process rather than an imperative one.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 1:01

>>61
Even if that should count as an actual reason (it doesn't), there's no reason why a fucking init system should have a Web server built in. Same reason why a bootloader should not be over 30 MB. The only real advantage that I can see from systemd is parallel service startup, which can also be implemented in a sysv style init system anyway.

Name: Cudder !cXCudderUE 2017-11-01 10:22

>>62
Same reason why a bootloader should not be over 0.3 KB.
Fixed.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 11:06

>>63
Memory isn't very expensive anymore

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 11:25

>>64
...And that's what you'll be saying when the bootloader becomes 1GB.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 11:38

>>65
well, if RAM gets sold in the TBs at that point, I probably would still say it

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 14:11

>>64

Memory could be cheap, but CPU time and bandwidth to process it are still expensive.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 14:12

>>63
Hell,
Cudder
, if anyone can get a ``modern'' bootloader down to that size, it would be a great start towards cutting out bloat. I'd be happy enough if it could be reduced down to floppy size.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 14:34

>>68

Floppy is enough to hold whole OS, together with GUI and a lot of software. Think Amiga.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-01 15:12

>>69
AmigaOS 4 is bigger than floppy size now.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-02 1:57

>>62
If you don't want systemd's web server, it's trivial to not have it. The real advantage of systemd is the declarative approach to init configuration along with server dependency tracking. The speed boost over SysVinit is just a nice side effect and not the intent.

>>69
That's only true for software that's targeted to a single platform and for a targeted use case. As soon as you demand for software that targets a range of platforms, as soon as you demand for software that's flexible enough to cover a range of use cases, the logic is inherently more sophisticated and in your terms it is "bloated". This software is feasible when you're writing that software for a small and targeted userbase.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-02 3:35

>>71
If you don't want systemd's web server, it's trivial to not have it.
That's not the point. If one wants a Web server, they can configure Apache or nginx or whatever. It doesn't belong in an initialization startup system.
The real advantage of systemd is the declarative approach to init configuration along with server dependency tracking. The speed boost over SysVinit is just a nice side effect and not the intent.
To be fair, I was never opposed to modernizing aspects of SysVinit, I can see in certain situations where one would need something a bit more ``sophisticated'' for more time critical things. There are already are very good init systems like OpenRC in Gentoo and
rc.d
in FreeBSD that are portable and carry the same basic ``advantages'' as systemd, with much less feature creep and footprint. It was implemented in the major distros because of politics and Poettering's ego, not because it was better in any technical sense.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-02 4:27

>>72
I've never actually looked at OpenRC. The features there is exactly what is needed for init.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-02 11:30

>>73
That's freedesktop.org's favorite trick. Set up an idiotic dilemma between the worst existing solution (or an imaginary one that is even worse, such as ``use old X forever'') and your new shiny turd, then stubbornly refuse to acknowledge that other possibilities even exist. If you are forced to acknowledge it, just FUD it to death like they did with OpenRC in Debian. Since almost everybody has already bought into the dilemma, nobody will check whether any of it is true.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-08 13:31

Okay, it appears that the whole flat UI fad is due to some retard design manager at Apple, taking over after Job's death:
https://www.fastcodesign.com/1670760/will-apples-tacky-software-design-philosophy-cause-a-revolt
“It’s visual masturbation,” says one former senior UI designer at Apple who worked closely with Steve Jobs. “It’s like the designers are flexing their muscles to show you how good of a visual rendering they can do of a physical object. Who cares?”

Inside Apple, tension has brewed for years over the issue. Apple iOS SVP Scott Forstall is said to push for skeuomorphic design, while industrial designer Jony Ive and other Apple higher-ups are said to oppose the direction. “You could tell who did the product based on how much glitz was in the UI,” says one source intimately familiar with Apple’s design process.

But before Forstall, it was Steve Jobs who encouraged the skeuomorphic approach, some say. “iCal’s leather-stitching was literally based on a texture in his Gulfstream jet,” says the former senior UI designer. “There was lots of internal email among UI designers at Apple saying this was just embarrassing, just terrible.”

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-08 14:51

>>75

These design niggers are like Haskell schoolboys, wanting to supplant good old tried plain C with their abstract overengineered out of order execution mess.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-08 16:54

>>76
Nothing wrong with Haskell.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-08 19:46

>>77
Everything wrong with it after the Foldable/Traversable mess. Not that C is somehow better.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-08 19:51

>>78
after the Foldable/Traversable mess.
What's this now?
Not that C is somehow better.
Did you get tired of hating on Russia and now you hate C all of a sudden, Nikita?

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-08 21:43

>>79

How can Nikita hate C, if most of his github consists of C/C++ projects, including Symta?

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-08 22:52

>>80
Nobody ever said Nikita was consistent.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-09 2:16

>>81
I did.

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-09 8:33

>>80
wasn't Symta written in CL? isn't it self-hosting now?

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-09 13:54

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-09 14:53

>>84
actually, my mother is CL

Name: Anonymous 2017-11-09 19:48

>>81
Is he at least complete?

Don't change these.
Name: Email:
Entire Thread Thread List